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Impact

Where we fight poverty

Fighting Poverty

Livelihoods programming and the Capability Approach


This research collaboration worked with selected VSO programmes to explore about how the Capability Approach can help us deliver our People First strategy in Livelihood programming.

Reducing newborn deaths in Ethiopia


Half of all new mothers in developing countries such as Ethiopia give birth without a skilled health professional present, often at home. This means complications can be catastrophic, with mothers not able to access medical care to save their babies - or themselves. 

Working at all levels of society to reduce impact of HIV and AIDS


Our Regional Health and AIDS Initiative for Southern Africa (RHAISA) co-ordinates our response in the region where two out of every three people in the world living with HIV reside.

Supporting Rohingya child refugees


Many Rohingya children have witnessed violence and loss first hand. Some have suffered abuse and torture themselves or were forced to watch family members tortured. 

Compounded by the daily stressors of displacement - like hunger, disease and lack of safe places to play or to learn - depression and other mental health issues are prevalent.

Improving sexual and reproductive health in Zambia


Zambia is the fifth youngest country in the world, with half of all people under the age of 15. At least twelve in every hundred people here are HIV positive.

Risk factors for youth include child marriage, forced sex and stigma around contraception and sexually transmitted infections.

Enhancing Employability Through Vocational Training (EEVT) Tanzania


Tanzania's huge youth population lacks the skills to take part in growing industries like gas. Unless we invest in youth, they'll be left behind and excluded from opportunities.

Overcoming rural poverty through farming innovations


VSO, in partnership with Syngenta, Bank Asia and DfID is helping 100,000 farming households to increase yields, income and create thriving agricultural communities by 2020.

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